Sunday, April 19, 2015

Pain Observation (x-post from G+)

Left leg:
Areas described exhibited generalized swelling.

My pain over the last weeks migrated after my knee slowly regained mobility, to the areas occupied by the Plantar Fascia, Anterior and Posterior Tibial Tendon and the Sesamoid Bone or #1 Metatarsus.

Anterior Tibial Tendon:
Pain upon flexing, swelling around the Extensor Reticulum and tendons.
After spending days in bed and using a crutch, pain in this area on my foot intensified when raising my foot off the bed or the floor. Raising my foot caused this muscle to tense, aggravating the pain.

Plantar Fascia:
Gout pain + spasms + cramps.
This pain manifested mostly at night, and cramps in this muscle accompanied the gout pain. As I fell asleep this muscle would spasm and the pain would wake me up. It felt better when I stood on soft carpet which allowed the muscle to relax.

Sesamoid Bone:
The pain manifests almost directly in the area described by this diagram, at the joint of #1 Metatarsus (shown in diagram as adjacent to the Sesamoid Bone.)

Pain description:
The pain is a deep stinging sensation (as intense as a Bee sting) like grains of sand between the bone and tendons, at each end of the identified muscles.

I noticed a generalized pain at first, but as I recovery progressed I also noticed a difference between the pain at one end of the Plantar Fascia and the other end, as if the so-called sand grains under the tendon at the Heel bone dissipated faster, however, this might be a false perception as the gout remaining in the #1 Metatarsal was still intense.

Pain Maintenance:
(THIS IS NOT A RECOMMENDATION. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS!)
I took 800 milligrams Ibuprofen every 8 hours. I was lucky not to have stomach bleeding. This stuff needs to be taken with food. The pain did not completely go away, it only enabled me to hobble to the kitchen and bathroom and immediately back to bed.

Recovery Maintenance:
I drank 3 liters of water per day and increased elimination rate with coffee. See: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17530681

When I worked at a Home Improvement warehouse, I would sweat profusely, after which I noticed deposits of salts on my black T-shirt when the sweat dried. From this I assumed that uric acid could be eliminated through sweat, but unfortunately this report contradicts my theory: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12817713

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